This is an ode to the shuffle. How better to get a good insight in your digitized album collection than by a classic shuffle? Finally discover the albums you never got into, finally throw the ones away you will never get into and worship those classics that never grow old again. The Shuffle of this week:

 1. White Stripes – I Just Don’t Know What to Do with Myself (Elephant, 2003) 

About time that I was going to put this album on again. Didn’t hear this for a long time although it was one of my favorites a few years ago. One of those albums from the past ten years that can easily be classified ‘classic album’ already. This is the only song from it that was not written by White himself, but by Burt Bacharach (with Hal David), who was recently honored with a lifetime achievement award for his tremendous contribution to pop music. Released earlier in 1964 by Dusty Springfield.

2.   Beach Boys – Sail On Sailor (The Beach Boys in Concert, 1973) 

Opening track of the Beach Boys’ second live album, which had just been released as a single at the time this concert was recorded. It originally appeared (or in fact it didn’t, as it was added after the official recordings due to the lack of a potential hit on the album) on their album Holland, as the group tried to find some inspiration there during the early seventies. Brian Wilson, who co-wrote the song, had (temporary) left the band during this tour.

3. Eels –Going Fetal (Blinking Lights and Other Revelation, 2005) 

From a double album that I should give another try one day. Later, maybe.

 

4. Beatles – Birthday (The Beatles (White Album), 1968) 

Talking about double albums, this one probably being the most famous one of them all. This song is of course the uptempo kick-off of side 3, with a great guitar/bass riff. Described by Lennon as a piece of garbage, but highly recommendable to those who like Macca best with an occasional scream.

5. Marvin Gaye – Wholy Holy (What’s Going On, 1971) 

A song about Jesus of one of music professor Hofmeijer’s all-time favorite albums.  However, when Marvin would have sung about a gnu in this song, many people would have believed him too. Great album.

6. Otis Redding – Mr. Pitiful (The Great Otis Redding Sings Soul Ballads, 1965) 

More soul this week with one of Otis’ best known songs, two and a half minutes of pure joy I have to admit. The song was written by Otis and his guitarist Steve Cropper (one of Booker T.’s M.G.’s), after a disc jockey had described Otis’ voice as sounding pitiful when singing his ballads.

7. Fats Domino – Honey Chile (This is Fats Domino, 1957) 

Fats Domino then! Gotta love an occasional shuffle.

 

8. Steve Earle – Down the Road (Guitar Town, 1986) 

Time for something completely different then. One of my favorite tracks from this country rock album, which was Earle’s debut as well as breakthrough album.

9. Mogwai – The Precipice   (The Hawk is Howling, 2008) 

Finally time to catch a breath then, after all those short songs after another. This track guarantees you seven minutes of dark, mystic atmosphere from the sixth album by Mogwai. Time to compare this one to Rock Action, released 7 years earlier, which I listened elaborately after a previous shuffle.

10. Creedence Clearwater Revival – I Heard It Trough the Grapevine (Cosmo’s Factory, 1970) 

And we’re also taking our time to fade out easily this week, after such a rush. And there’s Marvin Gaye again, as he gave this song its fame of course with his 1968 version (however, the song was written by Norman Whitfield and Barett Strong for Motown). It sounds kind of weird to say that those eleven CCR-minutes are pure nostalgia, when you were only born 15 years after the record came out. One of the first albums I met that contained music instead of sound…

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