This is an ode to the shuffle. How better to get a good insight in your digitized album collection than by a classic shuffle? Finally discover the albums you never got into, finally throw the ones away you will never get into and worship those classics that never grow old again. The Shuffle of this week:

 1. Alice Cooper – Halo of Flies (Killer, 1971) 

Fantastic start this week with this classic prog attempt by Vincent Damon Furnier, performing as Alice Cooper. Still a very popular song in the Netherlands, as this was the only country where it was originally released as single. In fact the whole album, Cooper’s fourth, is very strong. As it is the only one in my collection it may be time to get a follow-up, Billion Dollar Babies perhaps?

2.  Robert Johnson – If I Had Possession Over Judgment Day (King of the Delta Blues Singers, 1936) 

To the absolute roots of blues, with this archaic classic. Clapton of course covered it, and you can clearly hear that the cradle of the sound of all Clapton’s later bands stays on that mountain with Robert.

3. Talking Heads – Seen and Not Seen (Remain in Light, 1980) 

Quite a transmission then, with this to the last detail polished new wave from Talking Heads. The album is an absolute gem and perfectly suited to bring along on holiday, as it gives you a lot to talk about, without even necessarily playing it.

4. Pixies – Gouge Away (Doolittle, 1989) 

One of the few songs out there that reaches absolute perfection within such a short time. And another great album, this is becoming one of the best shuffles until today…

5. Otis Redding – Pain In My Heart (Pain In My Heart, 1964) 

… reaching status ‘epic’ halfway with this classic from Otis. Second week in a row for Otis, which  deserves a place on the mobile playlist for the upcoming weeks.

6. Manu Chao – Le Rendez Vous (Próxima Estación: Esperanza, 2001) 

Sounds very weird when it’s meanwhile snowing outside.

 

7. X – Back 2 the Base (Wild Gift, 1981) 

Another short intermezzo from a total different world, it’s becoming a strange medley in this way. American punk rock band from LA (after which they called their debut album), with this being one of the many short songs on their second album. Not that I’m a big punk fan, but I can certainly enjoy it when it comes with such vocal harmonies.

8. Jimi Hendrix – Voodoo Child (Slight Return) (Electric Ladyland, 1968) 

Turn down the medley then and clear the stage for this demonstration by the master. From the last part of the magnificent album trilogy, after Are You Experienced (1967) and Axis: Bold as Love (1967). The trilogy lifted guitar playing to another level, and Hendrix decided to finish it in a legendary way. After his interpretation of Dylan’s ‘All Along The Watchtower’, Ladyland  is closed with this mindblowing track.

9. Lou Reed – Strawman (New York, 1989) 

A very acceptable sequel I have to admit, with a fairly delicious opening riff. This album once more showed the genius songwriting capabilities of Lou Reed, containing some of his best work. With Maureen Tucker back on drums of course, but on this song it’s above all that pounding guitar riff that keeps coming back over and over again that does the trick.

10. The Avalanches – Two Hearts in ¾ Time (Since I left you, 2000) 

It pro definition had to be a disappointment after those 10 minutes of pure power rock, and in fact it is. I’ll give it one more try (update: ok, they’re out).

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