Monthly Archives: July 2013

This is an ode to the shuffle. How better to get a good insight in your digitized album collection than by a classic shuffle? Finally discover the albums you never got into, finally throw the ones away you will never get into and worship those classics that never grow old again. The Shuffle of this week:

1. Caribou – Brahminy Kite (The Milk of Human Kindness, 2005) 

Canadian Daniel Snaith released his first two albums as Manitoba, before changing his stage name to Caribou (due to a lawsuit). As such this third album was released, which contains some of his best work together with Andorra (2007). The two times I saw the band live couldn’t have been more different: first time in a dark tent together with around 40 other people, second time at Berlin’s Wuhlheide, being Radiohead’s support act during sunset.

2. Girls in Hawaii – Colors (Plan Your Escape, 2008) 

Continuing in the 21st century with this song from Girls in Hawaii. Other than the name might presume, we’re not talking about some girlpower group here but about an indie rock band from Belgium, whose sound might remind you of Grandaddy. Touring again this year with their new (third) album.

3. Cotton Mather – Camp Hill Rail Operator (Kon Tiki, 1997) 

We ran into this album before and in response to that I caught myself listening to it again for a couple of weeks. So I revalue this nineties gem once more to ‘most underestimated album of the decade’. Not much worthy material followed, but the band has reunited again since last year and is working on a new studio album!

4. Interpol – Obstacle 1 (Turn on the Bright Lights, 2002) 

A lost album really, despite being played a lot of times a couple of years ago. Actually very curious whether it would deserve the same amount of appreciation today. (update: their latter albums might still be worthless, this remains absolutely great)

5. Modest Mouse – Bankrupt on Selling (The Lonesome Crowded West, 1997) 

And back to 1997 with a track from a personal favorite of music professor Hofmeijer. He took it all the way to Greece to introduce it there 15 years later.  Great timing.

6. Seasick Steve – The Dead Song (Dog House Music, 2006) 

The first old dinosaur entering the stage this week, although he only broke loose this century. Very pleasant contribution, thank you Steve. (update: listened to the album as a whole some more times and gave up, goodbye Steve).

7. Pink Floyd – San Tropez (Meddle, 1971) 

At last we’re digging deeper into rock music’s archives with, of course, Pink Floyd. It’s the only song on the album that was entirely written by Roger Waters, who obviously also takes the lead vocals. The contrast with last song couldn’t possibly have been bigger.

8. Beatles – I Will (The Beatles (White Album), 1968) 

Staying in the mood with such another great feel good song from the master of the genre. And if you ask me to lay down and listen to the White Album the next couple of weeks, I Will.

9. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds – Night of the Lotus Eaters (Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!!, 2008) 

One of my favorite songs from the bands 14th studio album. Saw them live during the same year the album was released and what a great impression they made. Time to check out their latest (15th) album, Push the Sky Away, released earlier this year.

10. Guided By Voices – Little Whirl (Alien Lanes, 1995) 

The shuffle suddenly came to an end one and a half minute later after one of GBV’s longer songs. If mister Pollard is listening, there is still a fan in Belgium who offers his bedroom as studio to record the next album.

This is an ode to the shuffle. How better to get a good insight in your digitized album collection than by a classic shuffle? Finally discover the albums you never got into, finally throw the ones away you will never get into and worship those classics that never grow old again. The Shuffle of this week:

1. Grizzly Bear – Knife (Yellow House, 2006) 

Can’t you feel the knife? It’s Grizzly Bear’s second album, with the title referring to the bands own version of Big Pink, where the cd was recorded. After getting to know Grizzly Bear with this album, I kept following them which lead me to listening their last album Shields for the last couple of months.  Another strong album, although it has to been said that there’s a thin line between creating a typical sounds and repeating oneself.

2. George Harrison – See Yourself (Thirty Three & 1/3, 1976) 

Second time we run  into a track from this album, on which Harrison succeeded another time to combine some cheerful melodies with confronting lyrics to reflect on.

3. Frog Eyes – The Oscillator’s Hum (The Folded Palm, 2004) 

One of my favorite rock voices from the past couple of years must surely be Carey Mercer’s one, not only to admire on Frog Eyes’ albums (for example on this third album, the provisional highlight being their sixth album: Tears of the Valedictorian) but also on those of side-project Swan Lake.

4. Cat Stevens – Tuesday’s Dead (Teaser and the Firecat, 1971)

Over to the third part of Cat Stevens’ famous 1970-71 trilogy, of which this might even be the least part, despite being a great album.  On it of course one of Cat’s biggest hit singles ever, ‘Morning Has Broken’, which ironically was the only song on all of those three albums that he didn’t write himself.

5. Kraftwerk – The Robots (Minimum Maximum, 2005) 

Fantastic track from this bands’ 2005 live album. It originally appeared on their 1978 album The Man-Machine and both song and album can be classified as classics.

6. The Fall – Mother-Sister! (Live at the Witch Trials, 1979) 

Other than the title does presume, no second live album in a row here. To the contrary, as this was the debut studio album from the British post-punk band. Not really getting into this.

7. Throbbing Gristle – Weeping (D.o.A: The Third and Final Report of Throbbing Gristle, 1978) 

Welcome to the mysterious world of Throbbing Gristle. A moment I waited a long time for. Not that it’s one of my favorite albums or something, in fact I can’t say anything significant about this album. I got it once when it was recommended to me by a book, I listened to it a couple of times and put it back on the digital shelf. Once in a while it was hit by the shuffle and I glared out of the window to see if something could explain the suspicious noises I heard. Now it’s finally the moment to search for the true meaning of this album. (update: still searching)

8. Buena Vista Social Club – Orgullecida (Buena Vista Social Club, 1997) 

Track that sounds somehow misplaced on this rainy afternoon, but part of a great album. Recently read an interview with Ry Cooder, who could be considered the creator of this project after all, in which he said that this album and its success unfortunately also threw a dark shadow on the life of many members of the band.

9. Phish – Run Like an Antilope (Lawn Boy, 1990) 

During the very first shuffle of the week we already ran into this  debut album. This ten minutes lasting jam originates from the second album and is a true recommendation for those who like an ocassional improvisation now and then.

10. The Allman Brothers Band – Whipping Post (At Fillmore East, 1971) 

We totally continue to jam with this track, what a great way to close a shuffle and stretch it just a little longer! It covers the entire second side of this double live album and gives you a legitimate reason to exuberantly play some air guitar on a Wednesday morning.

 

 

Year: 1970

Genre: Latin Rock, Jazz Rock

Preceded by: Santana (1969)

Followed by: Santana III (1971)

Related to: not available yet

 

 

The border between Mexico and the USA is an interesting phenomenon. It’s the border with the most legal passages in the world. Besides, it’s probably also the border with the most illegal passages worldwide. Whatever the exact numbers are, Mexico as well as the US are both benefited somehow by this flow of immigrants. Cheap manpower is needed in the US, while the money transfers in the other direction are needed to support the Mexican economy. Carlos Santana was one of those numerous Mexicans crossing this border when moving from Tijuana to San Francisco and although I have no clue about his support of the Mexican economy, I do know he enriched the US and the rest of the world with Abraxas.

In this hippie capital of America, young Carlos was a live witness of the arising flower power culture. This led him to discovering different kind of musical genres, thereby slowly creating his own musical melting pot. In a time and at a place where a dozen bands a day were founded (with another dozen breaking up again), it was no surprise that Carlos himself was discovered one day. However, each of these discoveries in those days came with a legend, so here we go: Carlos was discovered while substituting the guitar player of an improvised band (composed by members of different bands like Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead), that was replacing an intoxicated Paul Butterfield.

Carlos quickly formed his own first band shortly afterwards: the Santana Blues Band (1967). He recruited David Brown from California on bass and Gregg Rolie (the original singer of Journey later on) from Seattle on keyboards and lead vocals. Some replacements and additions on drums and percussion were passed through before the band was shaped that would shine on the legendary Woodstock stage. It really stood out on this line up filled with psychedelic and folk rock bands, thanks to the Latin percussion setup consisting of congas, timbales and bongos. The eccentric combination of the rhythms that these instruments were able to produce together with Carlos’ traditional blues rock riffs made their performance a huge success; the Mexican immigrant was conquering America.

The band’s first and self-eponymous album (1969) was released as a logical outcome of this break-through and became a great success in Carlos’ new homeland. Does that mean that it was all good news for the band at that point? Certainly not, as the tensions within the group were following the success. The percussionists were dealing with personal issues and on top of that Rolie and Santana were having different views on which direction to continue with the band. Rolie wanted to emphasize the hard (blues) rock roots of the band, while Santana wanted to widen the jazzy sound. However, before the original Woodstock line-up would fall apart, it released two more parts of a legendary trilogy: Abraxas and Santana III.

Abraxas kicks off with ‘Singing Winds, Crying Beasts’ (written by conga player Mike Carabello). This track is in the end nothing more than the intro of what’s about to come, but an intro can hardly sound more perfect. With the album sleeve in my hands I’m slowly leaving the world I’m laying in while I’m sinking in this Fata Morgana of mystical sounds. Calmed at first by the wind chimes, but being startled suddenly by the crying beasts that are rising from Santana’s guitar. Aware of the danger but still a little uncomfortable because of this strange world I’m entering, I’m starting to hear some identifiable sounds. This is one of Fleetwood Mac’s early hits I’m listening to: ‘Black Magic Woman’, written by Peter Green. However, this version (sung by Rolie) has transformed the original blues rock song in an esoteric epos, thanks to the adding of versatile percussion, the mix with ‘Gypsy Queen’ and of course the enchanting guitar licks of the master himself.

I’m completely under the spell of this album now and another familiar composition has reached me when I recognize ‘Oye Como Va’ from the legendary Tito Puente. But instead of the flute and a brass section I’m overwhelmed by a striking combo of Greg Rolie’s pumping organ and Santana’s dancing guitar riff, interchanged by the Latin vocals. By adding these rock and blues elements to this song, Santana was laying the groundworks for Latin rock. But how about Santana’s own writing skills? Just when I’m reaching for the album sleeve to find about this, ‘Incident at Neshabur’ starts to play. Carlos wrote this song together with Alberto Gianquinto, which turned out to be a gem. Starting with a strong portion of jazz fusion, the song immediately grips you at your throat, strengthening this grip with a sequence of rhythm changes. The song keeps growing and growing with one solo after another, before releasing you with a relaxing outro. Time to take a breath now, before turning the record over.

The first song of side 2, ‘Se A Cabo’, immediately kicks us back into the album. It’s another fast song, but a lot shorter this time. Written by conga and timbales player Chepito Areas, it may be no surprise that the percussion is taking control of this song. But let’s not stray off too much, as the best song of the album is waiting for us: ‘Mother’s Daughter’. Maybe not that well-known as some songs on Side 1, as it doesn’t have that typical latin rock sound many people associate with Santana. But the real hard rock roots of the band are to be heard right here (clearly a song written by Rolie), with the vocals, guitar, bass, organ and  drums forming a great combo.

Variation is one of the secret powers of this album, tremendously illustrated by the way ‘Mother’s Daughter’ is followed by ‘Samba Pa Ti’, another song that was written by Santana and another latin rock classic. By far the slowest song of the album, completely instrumental and obviously dominated by the guitar playing of Sir Carlos. Over to another Rolie song then with ‘Hope You’re Feeling Better’, which was the third single of the album after ‘Black Magic Woman’ and ‘Oyo Como Va’. The song illustrates once more the great rock ‘n roll voice of Gregg Rolie, who opens the song himself with a great organ intro. The guitar playing is more raw than on the rest of the album, making this song a last highlight. Sure, there’s one more track left, ‘El Nicoya’, but this is in fact the most disappointing part of the album. After such a great intro, you might also expect some more inspiration in bringing it to a conclusion.

Abraxas knocked Cosmo’s Factory from #1 in the US, to be replaced at its turn (temporarily) by Led Zeppelin III. As pointed out already in this review, this success was mainly due to the fact that it contains so much variation without becoming an incoherent collection of musical genres. The smooth transitions between different genres give this album a very mature character, especially for a band that only just had its break-through and had to release its second album. Let’s finish with a quote from the album’s back cover, a line from Herman Hesse’s book Demian, that explains where the band got the name for the album from (the painting was used as album cover), and which is meanwhile also applicable to the album itself:

“We stood before it and began to freeze inside from the exertion. We questioned the painting, berated it, made love to it, prayed to it: We called it mother, called it whore and slut, called it our beloved, called it Abraxas….”

Top Tracks:

1. Mother’s Daughter
2. Black MagicWoman / Gypsy Queen
3. Hope You’re Feeling Better

Jukebox

HotelCalifornia1976 surrealisticpillow1967 doolittle1989 afterthegoldrush1970