This is an ode to the shuffle. How better to get a good insight in your digitized album collection than by a classic shuffle? Finally discover the albums you never got into, finally throw the ones away you will never get into and worship those classics that never grow old again. The Shuffle of this week:

1. Creedence Clearwater Revival – Hey Tonight (Pendulum, 1970) 

B-side from the single ‘Have You Ever Seen the Rain’, which is on the same album, Creedence’s penultimate one. CCR also deviated from its traditional pure guitar sound in these orchestral times on Pendulum, which was their second album in 1970 after Cosmo’s Factory and the last one with Tom Fogerty on rhythm guitar. You can pep up any party with this sing along.

2. Jethro Tull – Nothing Is Easy (Stand Up, 1969) 

Moving back one year when Jethro Tull is disclosing itself as an upcoming band. Still playing uptempo folk rock on this album, some kind of Cream-like hard rock actually on this track, but flirting with hazardous prog some years later.

3. The Beatles – Octopus’s Garden (Love, 2006) 

Originally from the same year of course, this Starr-Harrison collaboration from Abbey Road.This is the remixed version from 2006, thanks to George Martin and son. Especially the intro has some added value here, towards the end we slightly fade into the reversed Sun King.

4. Echo & The Bunnymen – Pictures on My Wall (Crocodiles, 1980) 

Heard this album plenty of times since last time, just like Ocean Rain. After long consideration I have to admit I might prefer this great debut in the end.

5. Bruce Springsteen – Born to Run (Born to Run, 1975) 

An artist I didn’t listen to for some months. Never been a huge fan, but of course an admirer of some of his albums, like this one.

6. Motorhead – Iron Horse/Born to Lose (No Sleep ‘til Hammersmith, 1981) 

An almost traditional couple of minutes live music then, from Lemmy and friends this time. Despite the album’s title it was not recorded in the London Hammersmith but in Leeds and Newcastle during a tour with the wonderful name ‘Short, Sharp Pain In The Neck’. I think there’s no other band that has a live album but no studio album in my collection.

7. The Beatles – Think for Yourself (Rubber Soul, 1965) 

If one band can’t surprise by coming around two times it must be this one. Harrison song with that typical Rubber Soul sound, uptempo folk rock with gordeous harmonies. Also the first album on which Harrison starts to write songs equally as good as those of Lennon and McCartey.

8. 13th Floor Elevators – I’ve Got Levitation (Easter Everywhere, 1967) 

The magical year also delivers an album this week. One of those many psychedelic rock albums released in the aftermath of the Summer of Love, predicted to be played many times during the following weeks.

9. Dub Trio –  Respite (Another Sound Is Dying, 2008) 

Tested and rejected.

10. The Olivia Tremor Control – Jumping Fences (Music from the Unrealized Film Script: Dusk at Cubist Castle, 1996) 

An album that was recommended many times by a colleague music professor, but without any success. However, in the nick of time it ends up on the playlist for the upcoming weeks.

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BornintheUSA1984 TheDoorsAlbum1967 RubberSoul1966 nilssonschmilsson1971