Monthly Archives: April 2014

1. The Velvet Underground – I’m Waiting for the Man (The Velvet Underground & Nico, 1967) 

Second track on rock’s all time best album. Written of course by Reed, about his main concern around that time. Blueprint for lots of garage rock songs to follow by numerous bands, thanks to Tucker’s forceful drums and the pounding piano playing by John Cale.

2. DeVotchKa – Too Tired (How It Ends, 2004) 

Song from DeVotchKa’s fourth album. The band from Denver was named after the Russian word for ‘girl’ and acquired most of its fame with contributions to movie soundtracks like this album’s title track. I suspect the Greek bouzouki of being the stringed instrument returning throughout the entire song.

3. U.N.K.L.E – Nursery Rhyme / Breather (Psyence Fiction, 1998) 

A muscular guitar part opens this next song, that sounds like something from Primal Scream’s XTRMNTR at first, but surprisingly proves to be a song that was written by Badly Drawn Boy. It stands on British music project UNKLE’s debut album, dominated by DJ Shadow’s production (who left the ‘band’ after this album). Other collaborating artists on this album include Thom Yorke and Metallica’s Jason Newsted.

4. Badly Drawn Boy – Summertime in Wintertime (One Plus One Is One, 2004) 

A little joke from the shuffle, serving another song by Briton Damon Gough. Six years later he became a moderately successful solo artist and released his fourth album. Certainly not as solid as his debut album, but containing a couple of reasonable tracks like this one. Reminds of Jethro Tull, thanks to the nervous flute intermezzos.

5. Yim Yames – My Sweet Lord (Tribute To, 2009) 

Not the first time we meet this one.

 

6. 13th Floor Elevators – Slip Inside This House (Easter Everywhere, 1967) 

Absolute masterpiece, later covered by Primal Scream (in which mood does somebody decide to cover this song?), defined by Tommy Hall’s electric jug. Recommended for when sitting behind the wheel, without even having to drive the vehicule.

7. The Zombies – Changes (Odessey and Oracle, 1968) 

Probably the most sunny sound from a British band ever, including some delightful Westcoast choirs and an intro that must have inspired some Fleet Foxes. Second album from the band, entirely recorded during the Summer of Love and featuring an apposite album cover.

8. Pacific Gas & Electric – Death Row #172 (Pacific Gas & Electric, 1969) 

Some blues gospel that didn’t save on orchestration. Strings and horns are all over the place in this track containing a certain amount of criticism on the Vietnam War.

9. Cream – Strange Brew (Disraeli Gears, 1967) 

This incredible funky guitar intro will probably never bore me. Did we have blues mixed with some gospel and symphonic orchestration on the previous track, now the blues is injected with a satisfying dose of psychedelia. The perfect album opener?

10. Super Furry Animals – The Teacher (Guerilla, 1999) 

Third album from this Welsh rock band, released at the end of the previous century and a lost item in my collection. Somehow sounds like Elvis Costello under lots of stress. Till next time.

Jukebox

AbbeyRoad1969 mrtambourineman1965 surrealisticpillow1967 aqualung1971