cotton mather

This is an ode to the shuffle. How better to get a good insight in your digitized album collection than by a classic shuffle? Finally discover the albums you never got into, finally throw the ones away you will never get into and worship those classics that never grow old again. The Shuffle of this week:

1. Caribou – Brahminy Kite (The Milk of Human Kindness, 2005) 

Canadian Daniel Snaith released his first two albums as Manitoba, before changing his stage name to Caribou (due to a lawsuit). As such this third album was released, which contains some of his best work together with Andorra (2007). The two times I saw the band live couldn’t have been more different: first time in a dark tent together with around 40 other people, second time at Berlin’s Wuhlheide, being Radiohead’s support act during sunset.

2. Girls in Hawaii – Colors (Plan Your Escape, 2008) 

Continuing in the 21st century with this song from Girls in Hawaii. Other than the name might presume, we’re not talking about some girlpower group here but about an indie rock band from Belgium, whose sound might remind you of Grandaddy. Touring again this year with their new (third) album.

3. Cotton Mather – Camp Hill Rail Operator (Kon Tiki, 1997) 

We ran into this album before and in response to that I caught myself listening to it again for a couple of weeks. So I revalue this nineties gem once more to ‘most underestimated album of the decade’. Not much worthy material followed, but the band has reunited again since last year and is working on a new studio album!

4. Interpol – Obstacle 1 (Turn on the Bright Lights, 2002) 

A lost album really, despite being played a lot of times a couple of years ago. Actually very curious whether it would deserve the same amount of appreciation today. (update: their latter albums might still be worthless, this remains absolutely great)

5. Modest Mouse – Bankrupt on Selling (The Lonesome Crowded West, 1997) 

And back to 1997 with a track from a personal favorite of music professor Hofmeijer. He took it all the way to Greece to introduce it there 15 years later.  Great timing.

6. Seasick Steve – The Dead Song (Dog House Music, 2006) 

The first old dinosaur entering the stage this week, although he only broke loose this century. Very pleasant contribution, thank you Steve. (update: listened to the album as a whole some more times and gave up, goodbye Steve).

7. Pink Floyd – San Tropez (Meddle, 1971) 

At last we’re digging deeper into rock music’s archives with, of course, Pink Floyd. It’s the only song on the album that was entirely written by Roger Waters, who obviously also takes the lead vocals. The contrast with last song couldn’t possibly have been bigger.

8. Beatles – I Will (The Beatles (White Album), 1968) 

Staying in the mood with such another great feel good song from the master of the genre. And if you ask me to lay down and listen to the White Album the next couple of weeks, I Will.

9. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds – Night of the Lotus Eaters (Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!!, 2008) 

One of my favorite songs from the bands 14th studio album. Saw them live during the same year the album was released and what a great impression they made. Time to check out their latest (15th) album, Push the Sky Away, released earlier this year.

10. Guided By Voices – Little Whirl (Alien Lanes, 1995) 

The shuffle suddenly came to an end one and a half minute later after one of GBV’s longer songs. If mister Pollard is listening, there is still a fan in Belgium who offers his bedroom as studio to record the next album.

This is an ode to the shuffle. How better to get a good insight in your digitized album collection than by a classic shuffle? Finally discover the albums you never got into, finally throw the ones away you will never get into and worship those classics that never grow old again. The Shuffle of this week:

1.    Death Cab For Cutie – 405 (We Have the Facts and We’re Voting Yes, 2000)


The shuffle started with the fifth song from the second album of this American indie rock band. Not much to add, hardly listen to their albums anymore.

2.    Pixies – Here Comes Your Man (Doolittle, 1989)

It continued with an absolute alternative rock classic from the Pixies’ second album Doolittle. At first I thought my shuffle had hit The Beatles’ ‘A Hard Day’s Night’, using the same opening chord. The Byrds-riff that follows keeps this one a favorite.

3.    Beatles – Come Together/Dear Prudence/Cry Baby Cry (Love, 2006)

With a small delay, the Fab Four play at last. Having the most songs of all artists in the collection, it’s no surprise to hear them again. This is the Love version of Abbey Road‘s opening track, mixed by George Martin and son. The transition to McCartney’s ‘Can you take me back where I came from’ certainly adds value to this Lennon-classic.

4.    Pink Floyd – Money (Delicate Sound Of Thunder, 1988)


Another classic rock evergreen in an edited release, as Pink Floyd plays their Dark Side of the Moon classic live in New York. With an extended intro and solos, it contains ten minutes of guaranteed joy.

5.    Beach Boys – Here Today (Pet Sounds, 1966)

Probably my favorite Pet Sounds track after, obviously, ‘God Only Knows’. The music written by Brian Wilson is just absolutely genius, filled up by  Tony Asher’s sad lyrics, sung by Mike Love. It starts with just a little glance now!

6.    Cotton Mather – Aurora Bori Alice (Kon Tiki, 1997)

Now this Texan rock band deserves a much broader appreciation. This album in my opinion is one of the most refreshing guitar albums from the past 15 years. The lead singer makes you think Lennon is still alive now and then, and the guitar licks just keep coming!

 

7.    Moody Blues – House of Four Doors (In Search of the Lost Chord, 1968)


Legendary song from a legendary album of a legendary band. Amen.

 

8.    Morrissey – You Know I Couldn’t Last (You Are The Quarry, 2004)


Took me a while to get into The Smiths and in the end I succeeded. Curious if the same will apply to Morrissey, till now it does. It takes me a while.

 

9.    Paul McCartney & Wings – Helen Wheels (Band On The Run, 1973)


Talking about legendary albums, huh? This track did not even appear on the UK versions as it was released as a single long before all the other hit singles kicked in. The album is without any doubt McCartney’s absolute solo masterpiece.

10.    Mogwai – Secret Pint (Rock Action, 2001)


The shuffle closes with the closing song from the third album of Scottish post-rockers Mogwai. That album goes on the mp3 player right away, long time since I listened to it.

Jukebox

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