mellon collie and the infinite sadness

The sun is eclipsed by the moon, so one way or another this darkness got to give :

DOK
# Artist Album Year 2013
30 The Band Music from Big Pink 1968 12
29 The Doors The Doors 1967 36
28 Brian Wilson SMiLE 2004 10
27 Paul Simon Graceland 1986 2
26 The Beatles Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band 1967 31
25 Neil Young After The Gold Rush 1970 24
24 Electric Light Orchestra Out of the Blue 1977 8
23 Crosby Stills Nash & Young Déjà Vu 1970 16
22 Pink Floyd The Dark Side of the Moon 1973 26
21 Radiohead OK Computer 1997 32
GvZ
Artist Album Year 2015
30 Harry Nilsson Nilsson Schmilsson 1971 *
29 Santana Abraxas 1970 11
28 Smashing Pumpkins Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness 1995 17
27 Kraftwerk Trans Europe Express 1977 *
26 Paul McCartney & Wings Band on the Run 1973 16
25 Crosby Stills Nash & Young Déjà Vu 1970 25
24 The Smiths Strangeways Here We Come 1987 28
23 The Beatles Abbey Road 1969 20
22 Led Zeppelin Physical Graffiti 1975 13
21 Pink Floyd The Dark Side of the Moon 1973 12
RKH
Artist Album Year 2015
30 Pixies Doolittle 1989 36
29 Grateful Dead Workingman’s Dead 1970 *
28 Paul Simon Graceland 1986 15
27 The Beach Boys Pet Sounds 1966 43
26 Kraftwerk Trans Europe Express 1977 *
25 Guided By Voices Bee Thousand 1994 44
24 Steely Dan Aja 1977 *
23 Bruce Springsteen Nebraska 1982 *
22 Radiohead OK Computer 1997 26
21 Donald Fagen The Nightfly 1982 25

Be it sight, sound, smell or touch, still marching with the soldier boy behind:

GvZ:

20. (7) The Beatles – Abbey Road (1969)
19. (24) Pink Floyd – Wish You Were Here (1975)
18. (13) Paul Simon – Graceland (1986)
17. (14) Smashing Pumpkins – Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness (1995)

16. (9) Paul McCartney & Wings – Band on the Run (1973)
““I yelled for joy, we passed the bottle, the great blazing stars came out, the far receding hills got dim. I felt like an arrow that could shoot out all the way.”

RKH:

20. (*) Van Morrison – Veedon Fleece (1974)
19. (7) The Beatles – Abbey Road (1969)
18. (19) Fleetwood Mac – Bare Trees (1972)
17. (21) The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967)

16. (22) Led Zeppelin – Led Zeppelin II (1969)
“Read out loud: Heks. Heks. Heks. Heks. Heks. Heks. Heks. Heks. Heks. Heks.”

1. Bob Dylan – Visions of Johanna (Live 1966: The ‘Royal Albert Hall’ Concert, 1998)


Famous live sounds of the master, from probably rock music’s most famous bootleg. As a result of his motorcycle accident that followed 2 months after finishing this world tour, it was one of Dylans last live perfomances until 1974. Dylan was backed by the Hawks, who kept him company during Dylans recovery in Big Pink and lined up again (as The Band) in that following tour of ’74, which was released on Before The Flood, another geat live album.

2. The Beatles –Yer Blues (White Album, 1968)


The best way to bypass your insecurity about something still remains acting like everything you’re doing is just one big parody, and before you can realize it everything you did ends up to be a smashing masterpiece. The combination of the ‘I want to die’ lyric with the oompah sounds and the terrific guitar solo makes this track one of Lennon’s most fascinating contributions to the White Album, on which it resides perfectly in all its nudity.

3. The Smashing Pumpkins – Thru The Eyes of Ruby (Mellon Collie and The Infinite Sadness, 1995)


Bombastic Pumpkins at their asolute peak, with Mellon Collie being the ultimate cocktail of riff & melody.  Luckily, and as always on this double album, the guitars dominate the second part of this song. Not very surprising by the way, as approximately 70 guitar tracks were used on this song. Quarrels with your bandmates seem inevitable at some point.

4. Bruce Springsteen – Further On (Up the Road) (The Rising, 2002)


Uptempo drums-driven intro, ultimate stadium voice: the striking come-back of The Boss. Springsteen had been on a 7 year hiatus and it was his first collaboration with the E-Street Band in 18 years. The Rising was Springsteen’s response to 9/11, but in fact it was just the next episode in the whole Springsteen-saga, in which the high priest repeatedly offers hope to his most dedicated followers during gigantic mass gatherings. Good album (just a little too much fillers?).

5. The White Stripes – I’m Slowly Turning Into You (Icky Thump, 2007)


From their sixth and final album: a rough song, with screaming guitars and a pumping organ. According to Jack White himself, an album about ‘being really happy’. What is there to add?

6. Fleet Foxes –  Sun Giant (Sun Giant, 2008)


Must have been the greatest contrast in clearness the shuffle could come up with. Both fans of Dylan and Neil Young, Robin Pecknold and Kyler Skjelset joined forces to start one of the best things that happened to popular music during the last decade. They delivered two very strong albums, treated us on some really marvelous folk classics (like ‘Drops in the River’ on this EP) and easily equalize the sound of some of the seventies’ most famous Westcoast choirs. Pecknold apparently suffers from social anxiety, and the fact he only hangs out with his bandmates offers us hope regarding the release of that long expected third album.

7. Cloud Nothings – Wasted Days (Attack On Memory, 2012)


Kings of Leon guitar intro? Green Day drums riff? Foo Fighters maybe? Wait, and your patience will be rewarded when echoes of Ride are coming through and it all turns into one big power trip. It all stems from the brain of Dylan Baldi, who made up numerous fictitious bands to place ‘their’ music on MySpace and find out whether or not somebody would appreciate it. One of those bands was Cloud Nothings, so just like Tame Impala and the early Grizzly Bear, it also started as a one guy project, that would only consist of a full band when playing live. This album (produced by Steve Albini), was the first one recorded with that live line-up.

8. The Kinks – Fancy (Face To Face, 1966)


Hypnotizing song full of eastern influences and the ultimate sixties voice of Ray Davies, somehow resembling Bowie and even a mopish Robert Plant here. Face to Face was the beginning of a dazzling period for the band, thanks to Davies’ nervous and physical breakdown preceding its release, as a lot of new songs that ended up on the album were written during his recuperation. Davies however continued to struggle, as that very new album (well, and the alcohol I prudently suppose) delivered him another bunch of headaches. Davies was not allowed by the record label to connect the songs with various sound effects as he intended and the psychedelic looking album sleeve was not at all to his satisfaction. Absolute fan.

9. Neil Young – Shock and Awe (Living with War, 2006)


Another old god with some more recent work, another anti-war one. Young’s lyrics and musical note are however not at all comparable to those of Springsteen: Neil is not here to give you hope, he wants to pour the incovienenth truth down your throath and asks you how it tastes. It’s an approach I appreciate,  just like the way Young offered his album: it was released on the internet, but only as a whole, not as separate tracks. No direct and easy to digest consumption, but only the complete message.

10. Brian Eno – Another Green World  (Another Green World, 1975)


This title track of Brian Eno’s third album, with a soft, rippling piano in the background, is the perfect soundtrack for that first spring morning. The window cautiously opens itself a little bit.

Getting close to the Holy of Holies, the top ten of the best all-time albums, but first: #20-11!

GVZ:

20. (12) Jethro Tull – Aqualung (1971)
“Like the bearded lady said to me: ‘Anderson unified dirty old men and the church, of course it’s a concept album, and a pretty damn good one too. Look out, a chicken-fancier!’ ”

19. (32) Van Morrison – Astral Weeks (1968)
“One of my worst dreams from the past year must have been the one in which I had written this album.”

18. (9) Panda Bear – Person Pitch (2007)
“From Holland to Wilhelmsburg before ending up in Christiania. That trip was mellow, man.”

17. (19) Led Zeppelin – Physical Graffiti (1975)
“Four musical geniuses ejaculating on all rock’s subgenres.”

16. (14) Radiohead – Kid A (2000)
“Welcome to this new century, I hope you’re feeling un-comfort-able.”

15. (21) Santana – Abraxas (1970)
“We called it mother, called it whore and slut, called it our beloved, called it Abraxas….” 

14. (*) The Smashing Pumpkins – Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness (1995)
“When one stuck-up musician is trying to outclass himself, great things can happen.”

13. (6) Paul Simon – Graceland (1986)
“The only album from this list you can recommend to everyone, regardless of their musical references. Except American cops. Boom Boom.”

12. (13) The Moody Blues – In Search of the Lost Chord (1968)
“Sgt. Leary’s Searching Souls Club Band.”

11. (18) Pink Floyd – A Saucerful of Secrets (1968)
“Gigantic explosion of the Floyd Shuttle on his way from psychedelic to progressive: one casualty, milestone album.”

RKH:

20. (*) The Flaming Lips – The Soft Bulletin (1999)
“Soundtrack of the late 90’s believe of the impending transcendence of humandkind to a higher plane of understanding and compassion. The Naive Album.”

19. (7) Fleetwood Mac – Bare Trees (1972)
“Works anywhere, anytime for whatever reason. The best example of ‘simply great music’.”

18. (31) Prince – Purple Rain (1984)
“How To Become a Rockstar for Dummy’s.”

17. (14) Crosby Stills Nash & Young – Déjà Vu (1970)
“Sometimes a penis measuring contest can result in great things.”

16. (8) Talking Heads – Remain in Light (1980)
“The musical Storming of the Bastille. No sire, it’s not a revolt; it’s a revolution.”

15. (16) Van Morrison – Moondance (1970)
“Yang.”

14. (41) Lou Reed – Berlin (1973)
“No Lou Reed the experimental rock machine, but the boomy chansonnier. My favourite blend of Reed.”

13. (17) Paul McCartney & Wings – Band on the Run (1973)
“The sound of an ego no longer obstructed by three other other ego’s. The best solo-Beatles album. There, I said it. Yeh?”

12. (12) Guided By Voices – Alien Lanes (1995)
“More hooks than a tackle box.”

11. (38) Pink Floyd – The Dark Side of the Moon (1973)
“The cosmic orgasm of the most important musical decade in history.”

GF:

20. Neil Young – Harvest (1972)
“Door rugklachten gekluisterd aan het bed, maakt hij in een innige omhelzing met zijn akoestische gitaar deze prachtige plaat.”

19. The Zombies – Odessey and Oracle (1968)
“Een ode aan de zon.”

18. The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground (1969)
“Zonder John Cale, aanvankelijk zonder succes, maar wat een nummers!”

17. Love – Forever Changes (1967)
“Liefde en altijd gaan nooit samen, buiten bij Love en Forever Changes.”

16. Lee Hazlewood – Cowboy In Sweden (1970)
“Ruig en dan weer zweverig, maar altijd diep rakend.”

15. Paul McCartney & Wings – Band on the Run (1973)
“Paul McCartney is nog altijd op zijn best op plaat.”

14. Tom Waits – Orphans: Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards (2006)
“Vanaf de eerste woorden van de bard Tom Waits waan je je in een rokerig café waar een oude man aan de toog zijn levensverhaal vertelt vol met prachtig vertelde tegenslagen.”

13. Townes Van Zandt – The Late Great Townes Van Zandt (1972)
“Het lijkt een verzamelalbum, maar het is een gewoon album met enkel en alleen de beste countrynummers.”

12. Neil Young – After the Gold Rush (1970)
“Soms enkel een piano, dan weer zware elektrische gitaren, maar altijd die stem … die stem en die teksten.”

11. Eagles – Hotel California (1976)
“Lange tijd niet de moeite genomen om dit album te beluisteren tot mijn oor bleef hangen bij ‘Try and Love Again’ en vanaf toen deze plaat again, again and again.”

Jukebox

CantBuyaThrill1972 StandUp1969 itstillmoves2003 transeuropeexpress1977