yim yames

This is an ode to the shuffle. How better to get a good insight in your digitized album collection than by a classic shuffle? Finally discover the albums you never got into, finally throw the ones away you will never get into and worship those classics that never grow old again. The Shuffle of this week:

1. Pacific Gas & Electric – Mother Why Do You Cry (Are You Ready, 1970) 

Surprising start, not being able to immediately identify this from the start. Band that was founded in LA in 1967 and existed only for a few years. Although they never reached a lot of fame, many people will recognize the opening song from the homonymous album where this track stands on. Because of that, there might be a tendency of calling this a one-hit-wonder, but both this album as there 1969 self-titled debut prove to be good blues rock albums, starring the stunning voice of singer Charlie Allen.

2. Guns ’n Roses – Get in the Ring (Use Your Illusion II, 1991) 

Power talking from Axl Rose on this track from the bands best album imo, which I really appreciated for a long time and was their only one to survive my collection. The times they are a-changin’ and I’m totally not into this anymore. Contains some good guitar riffs however, but why all the baloney towards the end? I presume I considered that cool once.

3. Wilco – Pot Kettle Black (Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, 2002) 

As may be known, one of my favorite bands of today. Only thing that remains for me is completing their oeuvre in my collection and considering whether they served enough years to qualify for a classic review already.

4. Sonic Youth – Cotton Crown (Sister, 1987) 

I listened to this album a couple of times following an earlier shuffle, but it didn’t really amaze me. Is the status of this band only due to that one cult album or do I have to dig a little further? Let’s try out 1990’s Goo to find out.

5. Jethro Tull – Cheap Day Return (Aqualung, 1971) 

Charming intermezzo by the velvet voice of Ian Anderson from the previously underrated and later worshipped Aqualung. This album really is like an old quality wine, only getting better by the years.

6. TV on the Radio – Staring at the Sun (Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes, 2004) 

Best known song from this Brooklyn band, at least for me, as my knowledge about them is still insufficient at this moment of writing.  However, I’m working on that as this album surprised me in very positive ways after some relistens.

7. Yim Yames – My Sweet Lord (Tribute To, 2009) 

Fantastic cover from the well-known Harrison song on this all cover EP, recommended already during an earlier opportunity. My Morning Jacket‘s singer Jim James interpretation of this song is somewhat slower, while adding some strength to the vocals with his characterizing voice. This definitely is one of the best singers in contemporary rock, having released his first full solo album earlier this year: Regions of Light and Sound of God.

8. Cocteau Twins – Aloysius (Treasure, 1984) 

First thing popping into my mind when hearing this: ‘Why did I ever get this?’. However, giving this album another try made me somehow adjust this original judgment. It’s the third album by this Scottish band and the first featuring their primary lineup, still including Liz Fraser on ethereal (most of the times non-lyrical) vocals. Even if you might not be a fan of such dreamy sounds in general, this album could possibly charm you.

9. Steely Dan – Reelin’ in the Years (Can’t Buy A Thrill, 1972) 

There’s the riff of all riffs again. Great album from the kings of the studio.

 

10. Booker T. & The MG’s – Back Home (Melting Pot, 1971) 

Completing this song cycle in an apposite way, as we already started with one of those other rare bands from the sixties-early seventies that were racially integrated. This is the last album to feature both frontman Booker T. as guitarist Steve Cropper, the latter one really shining on this song.

This is an ode to the shuffle. How better to get a good insight in your digitized album collection than by a classic shuffle? Finally discover the albums you never got into, finally throw the ones away you will never get into and worship those classics that never grow old again. The Shuffle of this week:

1.    Arctic Monkeys – When the Sun Goes Down (Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not, 2006)
If the shuffle is trying to give hints the past couple of times, than it wants me to start listening to the Arctic Monkeys again for some reason. It’s been a while, but I’m gonna listen to this album the next couple of weeks (update: never underestimate a good debut album, this still is a great one).

2.    Wilco – Poor Places (Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, 2002)


Penultimate track of the album I basically don’t know good enough (update: fan!), while I did  play the life out of their last album (The Whole Love) last year. For me this is one of those rare contemporary bands that keeps improving itself throughout their career and explores new directions.

3.    Arcade Fire – My Body Is A Cage (Neon Bible, 2007)


The shuffle keeps floating through the recent past with the third track from the zeroes in a row. A band that made a great impression with its debut, but of which I actually can’t say whether they continued in the same way. I realize at this actual moment that a lot of recent albums are catching dust in my virtual record cabinet.

4.    Tame Impala – Solitude Is Bliss (Innerspeaker, 2010)


On the other side, new recent albums are still added from time to time. This one for example, from a band that released its second album last year. However, for me personally, this debut album was one of the albums of that year, since I discovered it with a two-year delay thanks to DJ Grinder. At its best when cycling through a sunny city.

5.    Beirut – In the Mausoleum (The Flying Cup Club, 2007)


The shuffle really makes a survey of the past ten years, not missing out this wonderful song from Beirut.

 

6.    Pink Floyd – See Saw (A Saucerful of Secrets, 1968)


Finally we jump into the rich past of music history with this mysterious track from an even more mysterious album. I’m listening to this album some couple of weeks now, and it has really become one of my favorite Floyd albums. It incited me to make a poll about this, so please share your opinion.

7.    Grizzly Bear – Southern Point (Veckatimest, 2009)


And back to our musical overview of the past ten years with this track from the third album of this Brooklyn-based band. It’s the opening track, and also one of the best with some nice instrumental parts.

 

8. Ray Charles – One Mint Julep (single, 1961)


At first I thought Booker T. and the MG’s were kicking in again, but it turned out to be mister Charles. This is the version that finally claimed some fame for this song, in a swinging instrumental way. Original song by Rudy Toombs.

9. Meat Puppets – Violet Eyes (Too High to Die, 1994)


Abrupt transition than when we suddenly land into the grunge of the Meat Puppets. Also the opening track of the album.

 

10. Yim Yames – Long, Long, Long (Tribute To, 2009)


And the shuffle closes in a beautiful way with this cover from Jim James, the lead singer of My Morning Jacket, of this White Album track from George Harrison. This album, which is an entire tribute to this former Beatle, is hardly recommended by yours truly. If you’re not acquainted with it, only imagine this guy singing songs like ‘My Sweet Lord’ en ‘Love You  To’.

Jukebox

HotelCalifornia1976 DejaVu1970 Vol-1_1988 asaucerfulofsecrets1968